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Community Builders was founded by Bo-Young Lim, Eileen Nemzer, Janis Galway and Jerry Brodey, a committed group of educators with extensive experience in teaching, counseling, and working through the arts with children.  Janis and Eileen are now the Executive CoDirectors and Senior Trainers with Community Builders.  They are supported by a group of 12 Local Associates who collaborate on training projects in different parts of the province.

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Community Builders has worked in communities across Ontario including York Region, Toronto (Jane-Finch, Scarborough and South Toronto), Brantford, Sudbury and Espanola. 

We have worked in close partnership with 14 public and Catholic school boards and six First Nations communities in Ontairo. Since 1998, we have trained more than 2000 student leaders who have delivered classroom workshops in their schools. 

Community Builders programs lead by our student leaders and our expert training team have reached close to 70,000 people!

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Community Builders programs build the leadership capacity of young people in elementary schools.  We train students, teachers and parents in anti-bullying, social inclusion, equity and conflict resolution, while raising their awareness of racism, sexism, classism, and other forms of oppression. 

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Community Builders has worked for many years to develop and hone programs that are effective in teaching leadership and intervention skills to children.  Sustained leadership training of young people (Grades 4 through 8) has a significant impact on reducing bullying, harassment and social exclusion in school communities.  We know that early intervention can help reduce the potentially lifelong negative effects of mistreatment on perpetrators, victims and witnesses. 

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Research shows the importance of the skills taught by Community Builders Youth Leadership. While peers are present 85% of the time when others students are being mistreated, they intervene only 11% of the time. When peers do intervene, they were inclined to act aggressively, rarely displaying pro-social skills. (Making a Difference in Bullying, Report #60, April 2000 Pepler and Craig).

Clearly, children, just like adults, need to be taught conflict resolution skills so that they can act responsibly when they witness mistreatment. 

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